Coastal Conservancy Awards Over $17 Million for Coastal Protection

Coastal Conservancy Grants to fund land acquisition, restoration and coastal access

Riverside – This week, the Board of the California State Coastal Conservancy awarded over $17 million in grants for the acquisition of parkland, restoration of coastal resources and construction of amenities to help Californians explore and enjoy the coast.

The bulk of the awards was split between a grant of $6,200,000 to San Mateo County for the acquisition of the 58-acre Tunitas Creek Beach and $6,895,100 to nine nonprofit organizations and public agencies to improve coastal water quality, preserve and enhance coastal resources, and enhance coastal access within Santa Monica Bay and its watershed.

Tunitas Creek Beach

Tunitas Creek Beach, located between Pescadero and Half Moon Bay, has long been considered a local gem due to its long stretch of beautiful, wild, and secluded beach, and its dramatic rugged cliffs. Conservancy funding will support the acquisition of a 58-acre property that includes panoramic ocean views, nearly a mile of sandy beach and dune habitat, and a third of a mile of the Tunitas Creek riparian corridor. For decades, this private property was accessed primarily by locals and surfers. With no facilities and no park agency management, there has been a dramatic increase in adverse impacts on the property’s natural resources and public health and safety. Ownership of the property will enable San Mateo County Parks to develop safe and sustainable public access and recreation opportunities, reduce unregulated use and illegal dumping, and restore the property’s natural resources. Conservancy funds will also enable County Parks to prepare design, environmental review and permitting documents, with the intention of eventually opening the property as a new county park.

The Board of the Conservancy also authorized $6,895,100 to nine nonprofit organizations and public agencies for 10 projects that implement the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Plan (the Bay Plan).  The Bay Plan was approved in its current form in 2013 and includes specific goals and objectives related to water quality, natural resources and benefits to humans including, public access and education in the Santa Monica Bay.

The Safe Neighborhood Parks, Clean Water, Clean Air, and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2000 (Proposition 12, Public Resources Code Sections 5096.300, et seq.) allocated $25,000,000 to the Coastal Conservancy for the restoration of Santa Monica Bay in accordance with the goals and priorities of the Bay Plan. Prior to this week’s funding, the Conservancy had awarded over $17 million of Proposition 12 Santa Monica Bay funds for 49 projects in the Santa Monica Bay Watershed. The nine projects selected to receive the final tranche of Proposition 12 funding range from land acquisition to green streets construction to innovative water purification projects.

Other projects funded by the Conservancy at this week’s meeting include $1.9 million to construct a new campground in the Tijuana River Valley and $750,000 to plan new segments of the Bay Area Ridge Trail.

The full lists of projects considered and funded at the December Board meeting can be found here:

http://scc.ca.gov/2019/03/01/coastal-conservancy-public-meeting-in-riverside-march-14/

 

 

Notes to Editors:

The Coastal Conservancy is a state agency, established in 1976, to protect and improve natural lands and waterways, to help people get to and enjoy the outdoors, and to sustain local economies along California’s coast. The Conservancy is a non-regulatory agency that supports projects to protect coastal resources and increase opportunities for the public to enjoy the coast.

 

Since its founding, the Conservancy has:

  • Funded 2,400 projects along the California coastline and in the San Francisco Bay.
  • Protected 390,000 acres of coastal lands through acquisition of fee title and conservation easements.
  • Restored 33,000 acres of habitat.
  • Built 200 new coastal accessway and 210 miles of new trails.
  • Put $1.3 billion to work for conservation projects, and leveraged far more from federal, local government, and private sources.

 

Grant Announcement: Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions in Marin County

Marin Community Foundation

The California State Coastal Conservancy (Conservancy) announces the availability of a third round of funding through its Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions grant program for Marin County. These grants are made possible by funding from the Buck Family Fund of the Marin Community Foundation to address the impacts of climate change, specifically sea level rise, particularly on low-income communities and other underserved populations in Marin County.

Up to $900,000 is available for awards through this year’s competitive grant program.  The minimum grant amount is anticipated to be $50,000; the maximum grant amount is anticipated to be $200,000.  All applicants must submit a proposal application.  Proposals will be evaluated and the top-ranked proposals will be approved in mid to late 2019. Applications are due April 1, 2019.

The proposal application and guidelines can be downloaded in Word here and viewed in PDF here. 

There will be an informational meeting on Monday March 4, 2019 from 3-4pm at the offices of Marin Community Foundation, 5 Hamilton Landing, Suite 200, 94949 in Novato. Please come up to the second floor and check in with reception when you arrive. Please indicate your interest in attending by sending an RSVP to marilyn.latta@scc.ca.gov by March 1.

Eelgrass Planting

The Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions grant program seeks to support planning, design, permitting, implementation, education, and/or community-based restoration activities to address the risks and impacts of climate change and sea level rise; and to further advance nature-based adaptation solutions to protect and enhance the Marin County bay shoreline and outer coast. These funds can be used to support the following types of projects:

 

  • Small to moderate size, high-priority restoration projects located within Marin County that advance regional coastal and baylands ecosystem habitat goals, particularly ‘living shoreline’ concepts, including restoring native oyster and eelgrass habitats, sand beaches and dunes, tidal marshes, and other shoreline habitats;
  • Education and engagement of the public, especially underserved youth and communities more directly impacted by sea level rise, in restoration efforts, where possible;
  • Capacity building among critical partners in order to translate scientific data and analysis into practical solutions for broader implementation.

Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to Marilyn Latta, 510-286-4157 or marilyn.latta@scc.ca.gov.

 

Webinar: The Stories We Don’t Tell About People of Color in the Outdoors

A recording of this webinar can be found here.
We hope you can join us for a webinar Thursday, February 28th from 12:00 p.m to 1:00 p.m. to hear about engaging people of color in the outdoors. Speaker Amanda E. Machado will share her personal story as a woman of color becoming involved in the environmentalist movement and facilitate a conversation about how to be more inclusive.
“This talk will explore how traditional narratives in the environmentalism movement and in outdoor recreation culture as a whole have historically not reflected the values and experiences of people of color. In this talk, I’ll share my personal story of how I got involved in the environmentalist and outdoors space after taking a year off to travel and hike across four continents in 2012, and why I had felt excluded from those spaces previously. I’ll then present three-five common narratives our culture often tells about people of color in the outdoors, and discuss what they miss, particularly in terms of race and other systems of power. After, participants will have a chance to brainstorm how we can combat erasure and how can tell more than just– as writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie named — the “single story” we often have about people of color outside.”-Amanda E. Machado
Please register here.
The webinar will be recorded and a link will be sent to all registrants.
About the Speakers:
Amanda E. Machado is a writer, editor, and facilitator who has lived and worked around the world. After teaching 9th grade English as a Teach for America corps member, she spent fifteen months backpacking South America, South Asia, Western Europe and the Western United States. Since then, she built a career as a freelance writer while living temporarily in cities like Cape Town, Havana, and Berlin.
Amanda has been published in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, Vox, Outside, REI Co-Op Journal, Quartz, Business Insider, and others, and has worked as a social justice editor for Matador Network, the world’s largest independent travel magazine. Her work has also been featured in the New York Times, NPR, Longreads, Jezebel, the She Explores podcast, and several other publications, radio programs, and blogs. In addition to her essay writing, Amanda also facilitates workshops on issues of equity and social justice for organizations around the world.
Amanda has a degree in English Literature and Nonfiction Writing from Brown University.

Equity and Environmental Justice Survey/ Encuesta de Equidad y Justicia

The Coastal Conservancy is embarking on an effort to create Equity and Environmental Justice Guidelines to direct our agency’s work. The Coastal Conservancy’s vision is of a beautiful, restored, and accessible coast for ALL Californians and we see equity and environment justice as a key driver of our agency’s work.  We would like your feedback to help identify which priorities you think are most important for our agency to address. Please share with any others you think may be interested.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GWKLCZD

Surveys due March 6, 2019.

 

Coastal Conservancy está embarcando en un esfuerzo para crear recomendaciones y mejorar el programa Equidad y Justicia en el Medio Ambiente. Nos gustaría que sus comentarios nos ayuden a identificar las prioridades que considera más importantes en su comunidad. Gracias.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Q29HQNX

Encuestas programadas para el 6 de marzo de 2019.

Explore the Coast Program and Beach Wheelchair Grant Applications due April 8, 2019

MeWater Foundation participants in the surf

Explore the Coast Program Grant Applications

The State Coastal Conservancy announces the availability of grants to public agencies, tribes and nonprofit organizations for programs that facilitate and enhance the public’s opportunities to “Explore the Coast.” The purpose of this grant program is to help more people to explore California’s spectacular coast. Explore the Coast seeks to increase recreational, educational, or stewardship opportunities particularly for people and communities that may face challenges getting to or enjoying the coast.

 

This grant program seeks to fund projects that meet one or more of the following priorities:

  • Provides a coastal experience for people that may face challenges getting to or enjoying the coast (such as lower-income people, people with disabilities, English as a Second Language (ESL) communities, students from Title 1 schools or others).
  • Creates opportunities for people to visit the coast for the first time.
  • Provides a valuable recreational, environmental, cultural, or historic learning experience.
  • Increases stewardship of coastal resources.

 

Approximately $800,000 will be awarded in this grant round. There is no minimum grant amount; the anticipated maximum grant amount is $50,000.

 

Applications must be submitted by April 8, 2019. The application can be downloaded here.  Complete applications should be submitted via email to grants@scc.ca.gov. We recommend potential applicants review this linked Sample Grant Terms document when considering applying for Explore the Coast Grants.

 

Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to:

  • Karyn Gear, North Coast Program Manager (Del Norte to Coastal Marin), 510-286-4171 or karyn.gear@scc.ca.gov
  • Matt Gerhart, San Francisco Bay Area Program Manager (nine counties of Bay Area), 510-286-0317, matt.gerhart@scc.ca.gov
  • Trish Chapman, Central Coast Program Manager (Coastal San Mateo to Santa Barbara), 510-286-0749, trish.chapman@scc.ca.gov
  • Megan Cooper, South Coast Program Manager (Ventura to San Diego), 510- 286-4172, megan.cooper@scc.ca.gov

Beach Wheelchair Grant Applications:

 

The State Coastal Conservancy also announces the availability of grants to public agencies, federally-recognized tribes, and certain nonprofit organizations for acquiring beach wheelchairs that will be provided free of charge for public use. The purpose of this grant program is to help more people explore California’s spectacular coast. Beach wheelchairs increase recreational opportunities for persons with disabilities, seniors, and others who have difficulty physically accessing the beach.

 

Beach Wheelchairs

Approximately $100,000 will be awarded in this grant round. The anticipated minimum grant award is $5,000 and the maximum anticipated grant amount is $20,000.

 

Applications must be submitted by April 8, 2019. The application can be downloaded here. Complete applications should be submitted via email to grants@scc.ca.gov.   

 

Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to Amy Hutzel, Deputy Executive Officer, at 510-286-4180 or  amy.hutzel@scc.ca.gov.

Coastal Conservancy Proposition 1 Grant Solicitation

The Conservancy announces a new Proposition 1 Grant Solicitation, applications are due April 30, 2019.  Conservancy Proposition 1 grants fund multi-benefit ecosystem and watershed protection and restoration projects. Priority project types include: water sustainability improvements, anadromous fish habitat enhancement, wetland restoration and urban greening. The solicitation document and application materials are posted here.

Request for Partnership Proposals/Letters of Interest for the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program

The California State Coastal Conservancy (Conservancy) seeks partners for joint applications for coastal wetlands acquisition and/or restoration projects on the California coast or in San Francisco Bay to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 round of the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) National Coastal Wetlands Conservation (NCWC) Grant Program.  Only designated state agencies, including the Conservancy, are eligible to apply for NCWC grants.  However, the Conservancy can work in partnership with state and local agencies, tribes, and certain non-profits to develop and submit NCWC proposals.  The Conservancy can pass through NCWC grant funds to its partners to implement projects.  While federal agencies can’t receive NCWC grant funds, NCWC-funded projects can be implemented on federal lands.

If your project is selected, the Conservancy will work with you to prepare a NCWC grant proposal, which may or may not be awarded funding by the USFWS. The Conservancy will not award state funding grants directly through this solicitation.  The USFWS selects proposals for award through a merit-based, national competitive review process. The deadline to submit NCWC proposals to the USFWS for FY 2020 has not been set but is expected to be in mid- to late June 2019.  If projects are awarded a NCWC grant, funding will be available for implementation as early as Spring 2020.  USFWS will need to meet its project-related environmental compliance requirements before making funding available. A full description of the NCWC program can be found here:  https://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalGrants/

NCWC provides grants of up to $1,000,000 for the protection and/or restoration of coastal wetlands.  Grants are for project implementation, although it is permissible to utilize a small amount (~15%) of the grant for biological surveys or monitoring, planning and permitting if those activities are closely tied to implementation. Projects should be ready for implementation in Summer 2020 or 2021.  Projects will be more competitive if the project area is primarily made up of jurisdictional wetlands.  The NCWC grant program requires a non-federal match of at least 25% of the total project cost, consisting of either cash or in-kind contributions, and additional points are awarded for match of up to 33% of the total project cost.  The Conservancy may be able to provide some or all of the required match, but project partners with their own match will increase the Conservancy’s capacity to carry out more projects.  The NCWC program also prioritizes projects that involve multiple partners providing a cash or in-kind contribution. All projects must ensure long-term (at least 20 years) conservation of coastal resources.

Eligible Activities include:

  1. Acquisition of a real property interest (e.g., conservation easement or fee title) in coastal lands or waters (coastal wetlands ecosystems) from willing sellers or partners for long-term conservation;
  2. Restoration, enhancement, or management of coastal wetlands ecosystems; or
  3. A combination of acquisition, restoration, and management.

Ineligible Activities include, but are not limited to:

  1. Projects that primarily benefit navigation, irrigation, flood control, or mariculture;
  2. Acquisition, restoration, enhancement or management of lands required as the result of a regulatory or decision-making process to mitigate habitat losses;
  3. Creation of wetlands where wetlands did not previously exist;
  4. Enforcement of fish and wildlife laws and regulations, except when necessary for the accomplishment of approved project purposes;
  5. Research;
  6. Planning as a primary project focus;
  7. Operations and maintenance, including long-term invasive species management;
  8. Acquisition and/or restoration of upper portions of watersheds where benefits to the coastal wetlands ecosystem are not significant and direct; and
  9. Projects providing less than 20 years of conservation benefits.

More information about NCWC grants, including the FY 2019 Notice of Funding Opportunity, is available here: https://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalGrants/  Note that the FY 2019 Notice of Funding Opportunity for the NCWC program has not yet been released.

 

Letter of Interest Submittal: To indicate your interest in partnering with the Conservancy on a NCWC proposal, please submit a brief (~2-4 page) letter of interest via email to joel.gerwein@scc.ca.gov. The letter should include the following information: 1) 1-2 sentence summary of proposed project, 2) description of the need for the project, 3) description of the proposed project and how it addresses the need, 4) estimated project cost and description of potential match, 5) approximate timeline for project implementation (include information of the status of project design and environmental review for restoration projects), 6) indicate whether you have a willing seller for acquisition projects, and 7) list of potential project partners and their roles in the project.  Include a map showing the project area and providing the approximate acreage of the project area and acreage of coastal wetlands within the project area. Letters of Interest must be received by 5 PM PST on March 21st, 2019.

 

Eligible Applicants: Non-federal public agencies, tribes, and certain nonprofit organizations are eligible for funding. To be eligible, a nonprofit organization must qualify under the provisions of Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and its articles of incorporation must demonstrate that the organization’s purposes are consistent with Division 21 of the Public Resources Code, the Coastal Conservancy’s enabling legislation.

 

Questions: Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to Joel Gerwein, External Grants Manager, 510-286-4170, Joel.Gerwein@scc.ca.gov

Explore the Coast Advisory Board – Call for Applications

Brown Girl Surf

The Coastal Conservancy is seeking members for an inaugural Explore the Coast Advisory Board to advise on the application process, review of applications, and ongoing administration of the grant program.

The purpose of the Advisory Board is to improve the Explore The Coast grant program by harnessing the insights and experience of diverse stakeholders and to share decision-making power with the communities served by the program. Applications are due January 28, 2019 and can be found here: http://scc.ca.gov/files/2019/01/FINAL-Explore-the-Coast-Advisory-Board.pdf

Please contact Avra Heller on Avra.Heller (at) scc.ca.gov or (510) 286-1015 with any questions.

Coastal Conservancy Awards Nearly $4 million of state cap-and-trade proceeds going to protect communities from climate change

Coastal Conservancy Awards of $18.5 million in Grants for Coastal Protection and Restoration

Morro Rock

Morro Bay – This week, the Board of the California State Coastal Conservancy awarded $3.8 million for 12 projects in the Conservancy’s Climate Ready grant program, which supports projects to increase the resilience of coastal resources and communities to the impacts of climate change. These grants were part of a total of nearly $18.5 million in 19 grants for the protection and restoration of California’s coastal resources.

 

For the first time, this year’s Climate Ready grants were funded by state cap-and-trade proceeds, which are deposited in the state greenhouse gas reduction fund (GGRF) and administered by the California Air Resources Board. In order to meet GGRF’s legislative purposes, projects must facilitate reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and, where feasible, include additional co-benefits, such as investment in disadvantaged communities and economic, environmental and public health benefits to the state.  86% of the $3.8 million awarded is going to projects that are located in and benefit disadvantaged communities.

 

Also approved was $5.7 million for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to place dredged sediment from Redwood City Harbor at wetland restoration sites on the shoreline of San Francisco Bay. The Corps dredges approximately 1.5 million to 2 million cubic yards of sediment each year in San Francisco Bay, maintaining federal navigation channels for shipping. The sediment dredged by the Corps must be placed at permitted placement sites, such as the Deep Ocean Disposal Site or In-Bay disposal sites, or at beneficial use sites.  Many of the restorable diked baylands have subsided and need sediment to raise their elevations or to create transition zones prior to tidal restoration. This funding will enable sediment from Redwood City Harbor to be placed at restoration sites in Bay as the Corps requires a nonfederal sponsor to pay the incremental cost above the cost for In-Bay disposal to place the sediment at a beneficial use site.

 

“Both the GGRF-funded Climate Ready grants and the Beneficial Re-use of Sediment project are great examples of innovation in conservation.” said Sam Schuchat, Executive Officer of the Coastal Conservancy. “We are finding new funding streams and new technologies to accelerate our protection of coastal resources. In the race against climate change and sea level rise, we are using every tool we have to safeguard our irreplaceable natural resources.”

 

Additionally, the Conservancy authorized $118,000 to Sonoma State University and the Friends of the Sea Otter to implement two separate projects to aid in recovery of the southern sea otter.  Sonoma State University will undertake an analysis of the potential number of sea otters that Drakes Estero and Tomales Bay could support, and Friends of the Sea Otter will continue its public education programs focused on reducing stress on otters induced by interactions with humans.  These grants are funded through a voluntary tax check-off program.

 

The full lists of projects considered and funded at the December Board meeting can be found here:

http://scc.ca.gov/2018/11/21/coastal-conservancy-public-meeting-in-morro-bay-december-06/

 

 

 

 

 

Notes to Editors:

The Coastal Conservancy is a state agency, established in 1976, to protect and improve natural lands and waterways, to help people get to and enjoy the outdoors, and to sustain local economies along California’s coast. The Conservancy is a non-regulatory agency that supports projects to protect coastal resources and increase opportunities for the public to enjoy the coast.

 

Since its founding, the Conservancy has:

  • Funded 2,400 projects along the California coastline and in the San Francisco Bay.
  • Protected 390,000 acres of coastal lands through acquisition of fee title and conservation easements.
  • Restored 33,000 acres of habitat.
  • Built 200 new coastal accessway and 210 miles of new trails.
  • Put $1.3 billion to work for conservation projects, and leveraged far more from federal, local government, and private sources.

 

The GGRF-funded Climate Ready grants are part of California Climate Investments, a statewide program that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing GHG emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment– particularly in disadvantaged communities. The Cap-and-Trade program also creates a financial incentive for industries to invest in clean technologies and develop innovative ways to reduce pollution. California Climate Investments projects include affordable housing, renewable energy, public transportation, zero-emission vehicles, environmental restoration, more sustainable agriculture, recycling, and much more. At least 35 percent of these investments are located within and benefiting residents of disadvantaged communities, low-income communities, and low-income households across California. For more information, visit the California Climate Investments website at: www.caclimateinvestments.ca.gov

Proposition 68 Draft Guidelines

The Coastal Conservancy’s Prop 68 Program Guidelines are available for public review and comment. These guidelines explain the process and criteria that the Conservancy will use to solicit applications, evaluate proposals, and award grants with Prop 68 funds under the Conservancy’s programs.

Comments are due on November 12, 2018.  Comments should be emailed to grants@scc.ca.gov.