North Coast

Fleener Creek Trail-Lost Coast Headlands

Photo: Bureau of Land Management

The California North Coast region extends from windswept beaches in Del Norte County at the Oregon border, southward some 370 miles through Humboldt, Mendocino and Sonoma Counties, to the spectacular Marin headlands overlooking San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate Bridge. The world’s tallest trees, the California coast’s largest river, and the longest undammed river in the State are all found in the north coast. Timber, agriculture and commercial fishing traditionally shaped the economy, but tourism has become increasingly important, as the region’s stunning natural beauty and abundant recreational opportunities draw visitors from around the world. Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, the Lost Coast, Redwood National and State Parks, coastal paths in Mendocino and uncrowded beaches along the North and South Spits of Humboldt Bay are just a few of the North Coast highlights to be explored in California’s least-populated coastal region.

The five-county north coast region – including Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma and Marin Counties – is one of the least populated in California, with just under one million residents. American Indian tribes have made their home within this region for thousands of years and maintain a strong presence. Small cities straddle the two transportation corridors (Highway 1 along the coast and Highway 101 inland) and include Crescent City, Eureka, Ukiah, Fort Bragg, and Santa Rosa. Family farms, dairies, vineyards and rolling grasslands with grazing sheep and cattle characterize this area.

North Coast Project Priorities

The Conservancy’s North Coast Program recognizes the importance of this region, and supports projects in the area to preserve open space and working lands, protect and restore fish and wildlife habitat, provide new and improved opportunities for public access, and revitalize harbors and waterfronts. Major focus areas include:

  • Protect Working Landscapes
  • Protect, Restore and Enhance Fish and Wildlife Habitat
  • Support Restoration of Waterfronts
  • Complete the Coastal Trail

North Coast Projects

Click on the links below to find out more about the Coastal Conservancy’s work.

SCC/OPC Project Viewer

SCC Project Viewer

North Coast News

  • Eel River Estuary and Centerville Slough Enhancement Project
    Revised Notice of Preparation of Draft Environmental Impact Report for Eel River Estuary and Centerville Slough Enhancement Project Draft Environmental Impact Report Volume I for Eel River Estuary and Centerville Slough Enhancement Project Draft Environmental Impact Report Volume II for Eel River Estuary and Centerville Slough Enhancement Project Recirculated Draft Environmental Impact Report for Eel […] (Read more on Eel River Estuary...)
  • The Conservancy at 40 Years: Marin County
    The next time you are traveling around west Marin, imagine the expansive rolling hills covered with thousands of homes and highways instead of family farms.  That was the future for many of the ranches and farms of west Marin County if concerned citizens hadn’t banded together to protect Marin’s 150-year old farming heritage. Approximately 40 […] (Read more on The Conservancy at...)
  • The Conservancy at 40 Years: Fort Bragg
    How many stretches of the California Coastal Trail feature a dynamite shack?  Fort Bragg may have the only one in California! The innocuous looking concrete structure stands on the edge of the bluff in Noyo Headlands Park, the home of the city’s newly opened four mile Kah Kahleh trail, part of the Coastal Trail.  The […] (Read more on The Conservancy at...)
  • The Conservancy at 40 Years: The Eel River
    Wild and untamed, the Eel River is California’s third largest river system. Once the fourth largest producer of salmon on the Pacific Coast, its salmon runs once exceeded one million fish per year. From headwaters to the sea, the Coastal Conservancy and its partners have worked hard to restore fisheries, protect working lands and enhance […] (Read more on The Conservancy at...)
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