Coastal Conservancy Awards $12.5 Million for Coastal Restoration and Protection Projects

SACRAMENTO – Today, the Board of the State Coastal Conservancy awarded over $12.5 million in grants for the protection and restoration of California’s coast and the San Francisco Bay.  Grantees included public agencies, cities and 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations whose purposes are consistent with the Conservancy’s enabling legislation.

Among the grants awarded were $3.9 million to the City of Goleta for enhancement of monarch butterfly and other wildlife habitat at Ellwood Mesa in Santa Barbara County and $4.7 million for the planning, management, treatment, monitoring, and restoration activities of the San Francisco Estuary Invasive Spartina Project in the San Francisco Bay.

“The grants awarded today show the breadth of the Conservancy’s work.” said Sam Schuchat, Executive Officer of the Coastal Conservancy. “From small projects to make local treasures like Pie Ranch accessible to more Californians to the implementation of large-scale invasive plant removal, the Conservancy aims to get the maximum benefit out of every dollar we allocate for the people, the wildlife and the ecosystems of this state.”

The full list of grants can be found here: http://scc.ca.gov/2019/05/03/coastal-conservancy-public-meeting-in-sacramento-may-16/

 

Climate Ready Grant Round

The Conservancy announces a new Climate Ready grant solicitation; applications are due July 1, 2019. Climate Ready grants fund nature-based solutions for climate adaptation. This round will fund planning and implementation of managed retreat, natural shoreline infrastructure, living shorelines and habitat enhancement projects. This round is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund, and projects must facilitate greenhouse gas emission reductions. The solicitation document and application materials are posted here.

SF Bay Area Prop 68 Draft Climate Adaptation Grant Guidelines

Prop 68 provides funding to assist coastal communities with adaptation to climate change, including $14 million allocated to the San Francisco Bay Area Conservancy Program of the Coastal Conservancy (“Prop 68 SF Bay Climate Funds”). This chapter of Prop 68 requires that the Coastal Conservancy (“Conservancy”) develop competitive grant guidelines. The draft guidelines are posted here. Comments on the draft guidelines should be emailed to: grants@scc.ca.gov by July 19, 2019. The Conservancy will also hold three public meetings to receive comments on these guidelines.

Workshop Dates:

o   Workshop #1

May 16th, 2019 from 1:30p-3:30p
State Capitol, Room 126
1315 10th St. Sacramento, CA 95814

o   Workshop #2

June 6th, 2019 from 1:00p-3:00p
Redwood City Public Library, Community Room
1044 Middlefield Road, Redwood City, CA 94063

o   Workshop #3

June 27th, 2019 from 1:00p-3:00p
1515 Clay Street, 2nd Floor, Room #11
Oakland, CA 94612

Coastal Conservancy Awards Over $17 Million for Coastal Protection

Coastal Conservancy Grants to fund land acquisition, restoration and coastal access

Riverside – This week, the Board of the California State Coastal Conservancy awarded over $17 million in grants for the acquisition of parkland, restoration of coastal resources and construction of amenities to help Californians explore and enjoy the coast.

The bulk of the awards was split between a grant of $6,200,000 to San Mateo County for the acquisition of the 58-acre Tunitas Creek Beach and $6,895,100 to nine nonprofit organizations and public agencies to improve coastal water quality, preserve and enhance coastal resources, and enhance coastal access within Santa Monica Bay and its watershed.

Tunitas Creek Beach

Tunitas Creek Beach, located between Pescadero and Half Moon Bay, has long been considered a local gem due to its long stretch of beautiful, wild, and secluded beach, and its dramatic rugged cliffs. Conservancy funding will support the acquisition of a 58-acre property that includes panoramic ocean views, nearly a mile of sandy beach and dune habitat, and a third of a mile of the Tunitas Creek riparian corridor. For decades, this private property was accessed primarily by locals and surfers. With no facilities and no park agency management, there has been a dramatic increase in adverse impacts on the property’s natural resources and public health and safety. Ownership of the property will enable San Mateo County Parks to develop safe and sustainable public access and recreation opportunities, reduce unregulated use and illegal dumping, and restore the property’s natural resources. Conservancy funds will also enable County Parks to prepare design, environmental review and permitting documents, with the intention of eventually opening the property as a new county park.

The Board of the Conservancy also authorized $6,895,100 to nine nonprofit organizations and public agencies for 10 projects that implement the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Plan (the Bay Plan).  The Bay Plan was approved in its current form in 2013 and includes specific goals and objectives related to water quality, natural resources and benefits to humans including, public access and education in the Santa Monica Bay.

The Safe Neighborhood Parks, Clean Water, Clean Air, and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2000 (Proposition 12, Public Resources Code Sections 5096.300, et seq.) allocated $25,000,000 to the Coastal Conservancy for the restoration of Santa Monica Bay in accordance with the goals and priorities of the Bay Plan. Prior to this week’s funding, the Conservancy had awarded over $17 million of Proposition 12 Santa Monica Bay funds for 49 projects in the Santa Monica Bay Watershed. The nine projects selected to receive the final tranche of Proposition 12 funding range from land acquisition to green streets construction to innovative water purification projects.

Other projects funded by the Conservancy at this week’s meeting include $1.9 million to construct a new campground in the Tijuana River Valley and $750,000 to plan new segments of the Bay Area Ridge Trail.

The full lists of projects considered and funded at the December Board meeting can be found here:

http://scc.ca.gov/2019/03/01/coastal-conservancy-public-meeting-in-riverside-march-14/

 

 

Notes to Editors:

The Coastal Conservancy is a state agency, established in 1976, to protect and improve natural lands and waterways, to help people get to and enjoy the outdoors, and to sustain local economies along California’s coast. The Conservancy is a non-regulatory agency that supports projects to protect coastal resources and increase opportunities for the public to enjoy the coast.

 

Since its founding, the Conservancy has:

  • Funded 2,400 projects along the California coastline and in the San Francisco Bay.
  • Protected 390,000 acres of coastal lands through acquisition of fee title and conservation easements.
  • Restored 33,000 acres of habitat.
  • Built 200 new coastal accessway and 210 miles of new trails.
  • Put $1.3 billion to work for conservation projects, and leveraged far more from federal, local government, and private sources.

 

Press Release: Coastal Conservancy Receives $4.25 Million for Central Coast Fire Resiliency Projects

Funding from the California Natural Resources Agency and Department of Conservation will improve forest health and increase fire resiliency

 Oakland – Today, the California State Coastal Conservancy has been awarded $4.25 million in a block grant from the California Natural Resources Agency and Department of Conservation for projects that strengthen fire resiliency and improve forest health in central California.  This grant is one of eight, totaling $20 million, awarded to agencies throughout the state to implement the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program.

“The Central Coast is home to some of the California’s most pristine coastal forests; it has also been the site of some of the state’s most devastating wildfires. A risk that persists today.” said Sam Schuchat, Executive Officer of the Coastal Conservancy, “It takes years for communities and ecosystems to recover from the damage caused by catastrophic fires. With this funding, we will support projects that increase the health of central California’s forests to make them more resistant to fire and better able to recover from fire’s impacts.”

Funded by Cap-and-Trade revenues through California Climate Investments, the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program aims to help communities prioritize, develop, and implement projects to strengthen fire resiliency, increase carbon sequestration, and facilitate greenhouse gas reductions.

The program is one element of the state’s efforts to improve forest health, protect communities from wildfire risk and implement the California Forest Carbon Plan and Executive Order B-52-18. Projects funded through the program will build on priority projects identified by the Forest Management Task Force and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection through Executive Order N-05-19.

“Getting this funding out the door will help local communities develop watershed-level projects that can make a big difference in forest health and fire resiliency,” California Secretary for Natural Resources Wade Crowfoot said. “With California facing unprecedented wildfire risk, we need every tool available to put the state on a path toward long-term wildfire prevention and forest health.”

The Conservancy will oversee distribution of funding and collaborative planning with local entities including municipal and Tribal governments, nonprofits and community organizations, land trusts, Resource Conservation Districts, residents, private and public forest landowners and managers, businesses, and others to accomplish the program’s objectives in central California.

Block grant recipients were selected based on their history of implementing related projects, demonstrated capacity to work across regional partners, and ability to serve as fiscal administrators for the program.

The block grant recipients by region include:

North Coast:

  • The North Coast Resource Partnership, $4.25 million

Central California:

  • California State Coastal Conservancy, $4.25 million

Southern California:

  • Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, $1.5 million
  • Inland Empire Resource Conservation District, $1.5 million
  • Greater San Diego Resource Conservation District, $1.5 million

Sierra and Klamath-Cascade:

  • Sierra Nevada Conservancy, $2 million
  • Assembly Bill 2551 implementation (awardees to be determined), $2 million

Statewide:

  • Watershed Resource and Training Center in partnership with the California Fire Safe Council, $3 million

The program will be administered by the Department of Conservation on behalf of the California Natural Resources Agency.

###

Notes to Editors:

The Coastal Conservancy is a state agency, established in 1976, to protect and improve natural lands and waterways, to help people get to and enjoy the outdoors, and to sustain local economies along California’s coast. The Conservancy is a non-regulatory agency that supports projects to protect coastal resources and increase opportunities for the public to enjoy the coast.

 

Since its founding, the Conservancy has:

  • Funded 2,400 projects along the California coastline and in the San Francisco Bay.
  • Protected 390,000 acres of coastal lands through acquisition of fee title and conservation easements.
  • Restored 33,000 acres of habitat.
  • Built 200 new coastal accessway and 210 miles of new trails.
  • Put $1.3 billion to work for conservation projects, and leveraged far more from federal, local government, and private sources.

 

Grant Announcement: Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions in Marin County

Marin Community Foundation

The California State Coastal Conservancy (Conservancy) announces the availability of a third round of funding through its Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions grant program for Marin County. These grants are made possible by funding from the Buck Family Fund of the Marin Community Foundation to address the impacts of climate change, specifically sea level rise, particularly on low-income communities and other underserved populations in Marin County.

Up to $900,000 is available for awards through this year’s competitive grant program.  The minimum grant amount is anticipated to be $50,000; the maximum grant amount is anticipated to be $200,000.  All applicants must submit a proposal application.  Proposals will be evaluated and the top-ranked proposals will be approved in mid to late 2019. Applications are due April 1, 2019.

The proposal application and guidelines can be downloaded in Word here and viewed in PDF here. 

There will be an informational meeting on Monday March 4, 2019 from 3-4pm at the offices of Marin Community Foundation, 5 Hamilton Landing, Suite 200, 94949 in Novato. Please come up to the second floor and check in with reception when you arrive. Please indicate your interest in attending by sending an RSVP to marilyn.latta@scc.ca.gov by March 1.

Eelgrass Planting

The Advancing Nature-Based Adaptation Solutions grant program seeks to support planning, design, permitting, implementation, education, and/or community-based restoration activities to address the risks and impacts of climate change and sea level rise; and to further advance nature-based adaptation solutions to protect and enhance the Marin County bay shoreline and outer coast. These funds can be used to support the following types of projects:

 

  • Small to moderate size, high-priority restoration projects located within Marin County that advance regional coastal and baylands ecosystem habitat goals, particularly ‘living shoreline’ concepts, including restoring native oyster and eelgrass habitats, sand beaches and dunes, tidal marshes, and other shoreline habitats;
  • Education and engagement of the public, especially underserved youth and communities more directly impacted by sea level rise, in restoration efforts, where possible;
  • Capacity building among critical partners in order to translate scientific data and analysis into practical solutions for broader implementation.

Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to Marilyn Latta, 510-286-4157 or marilyn.latta@scc.ca.gov.

 

Coastal Conservancy Proposition 1 Grant Solicitation

The Conservancy announces a new Proposition 1 Grant Solicitation, applications are due April 30, 2019.  Conservancy Proposition 1 grants fund multi-benefit ecosystem and watershed protection and restoration projects. Priority project types include: water sustainability improvements, anadromous fish habitat enhancement, wetland restoration and urban greening. The solicitation document and application materials are posted here.

Request for Partnership Proposals/Letters of Interest for the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program

The California State Coastal Conservancy (Conservancy) seeks partners for joint applications for coastal wetlands acquisition and/or restoration projects on the California coast or in San Francisco Bay to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 round of the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) National Coastal Wetlands Conservation (NCWC) Grant Program.  Only designated state agencies, including the Conservancy, are eligible to apply for NCWC grants.  However, the Conservancy can work in partnership with state and local agencies, tribes, and certain non-profits to develop and submit NCWC proposals.  The Conservancy can pass through NCWC grant funds to its partners to implement projects.  While federal agencies can’t receive NCWC grant funds, NCWC-funded projects can be implemented on federal lands.

If your project is selected, the Conservancy will work with you to prepare a NCWC grant proposal, which may or may not be awarded funding by the USFWS. The Conservancy will not award state funding grants directly through this solicitation.  The USFWS selects proposals for award through a merit-based, national competitive review process. The deadline to submit NCWC proposals to the USFWS for FY 2020 has not been set but is expected to be in mid- to late June 2019.  If projects are awarded a NCWC grant, funding will be available for implementation as early as Spring 2020.  USFWS will need to meet its project-related environmental compliance requirements before making funding available. A full description of the NCWC program can be found here:  https://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalGrants/

NCWC provides grants of up to $1,000,000 for the protection and/or restoration of coastal wetlands.  Grants are for project implementation, although it is permissible to utilize a small amount (~15%) of the grant for biological surveys or monitoring, planning and permitting if those activities are closely tied to implementation. Projects should be ready for implementation in Summer 2020 or 2021.  Projects will be more competitive if the project area is primarily made up of jurisdictional wetlands.  The NCWC grant program requires a non-federal match of at least 25% of the total project cost, consisting of either cash or in-kind contributions, and additional points are awarded for match of up to 33% of the total project cost.  The Conservancy may be able to provide some or all of the required match, but project partners with their own match will increase the Conservancy’s capacity to carry out more projects.  The NCWC program also prioritizes projects that involve multiple partners providing a cash or in-kind contribution. All projects must ensure long-term (at least 20 years) conservation of coastal resources.

Eligible Activities include:

  1. Acquisition of a real property interest (e.g., conservation easement or fee title) in coastal lands or waters (coastal wetlands ecosystems) from willing sellers or partners for long-term conservation;
  2. Restoration, enhancement, or management of coastal wetlands ecosystems; or
  3. A combination of acquisition, restoration, and management.

Ineligible Activities include, but are not limited to:

  1. Projects that primarily benefit navigation, irrigation, flood control, or mariculture;
  2. Acquisition, restoration, enhancement or management of lands required as the result of a regulatory or decision-making process to mitigate habitat losses;
  3. Creation of wetlands where wetlands did not previously exist;
  4. Enforcement of fish and wildlife laws and regulations, except when necessary for the accomplishment of approved project purposes;
  5. Research;
  6. Planning as a primary project focus;
  7. Operations and maintenance, including long-term invasive species management;
  8. Acquisition and/or restoration of upper portions of watersheds where benefits to the coastal wetlands ecosystem are not significant and direct; and
  9. Projects providing less than 20 years of conservation benefits.

More information about NCWC grants, including the FY 2019 Notice of Funding Opportunity, is available here: https://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalGrants/  Note that the FY 2019 Notice of Funding Opportunity for the NCWC program has not yet been released.

 

Letter of Interest Submittal: To indicate your interest in partnering with the Conservancy on a NCWC proposal, please submit a brief (~2-4 page) letter of interest via email to joel.gerwein@scc.ca.gov. The letter should include the following information: 1) 1-2 sentence summary of proposed project, 2) description of the need for the project, 3) description of the proposed project and how it addresses the need, 4) estimated project cost and description of potential match, 5) approximate timeline for project implementation (include information of the status of project design and environmental review for restoration projects), 6) indicate whether you have a willing seller for acquisition projects, and 7) list of potential project partners and their roles in the project.  Include a map showing the project area and providing the approximate acreage of the project area and acreage of coastal wetlands within the project area. Letters of Interest must be received by 5 PM PST on March 21st, 2019.

 

Eligible Applicants: Non-federal public agencies, tribes, and certain nonprofit organizations are eligible for funding. To be eligible, a nonprofit organization must qualify under the provisions of Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and its articles of incorporation must demonstrate that the organization’s purposes are consistent with Division 21 of the Public Resources Code, the Coastal Conservancy’s enabling legislation.

 

Questions: Questions about the application process and potential projects may be directed to Joel Gerwein, External Grants Manager, 510-286-4170, Joel.Gerwein@scc.ca.gov

Priority Conservation Area Grants – Call for Proposals

The State Coastal Conservancy, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), is pleased to issue a call for proposals focused on the Bay Area’s Priority Conservation Areas (PCA) designated under Plan Bay Area 2040.  Information on the program is available at: https://abag.ca.gov/priority/conservation/index.html, and the grant guidelines are here: https://abag.ca.gov/priority/conservation/pdfs/2019_PCA_Guidelines.pdf

The PCA Grant Program provides funding to cities, counties, park districts, utility districts and other agencies and non-profits to acquire, enhance, or improve areas designated as conservation priorities.  Maps of PCAs can be found here: https://abag.ca.gov/priority/conservation/maps.html 

For this funding opportunity, projects must be located in Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo, or Santa Clara County. Multi-county projects are allowed and encouraged. The PCA Grant Program for the four North Bay counties (Marin, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma County) is managed separately from this call for projects by each county’s transportation authority.

There will be two workshops to provide prospective applicants with an overview of the PCA Program.

Workshop 1
February 5, 2019, 1-3 PM,
1515 Clay St., Room 10 (2nd floor)
Oakland, CA 94612

Workshop 2
February 7, 2019, 10 AM-12 PM
700 Alma St., Oak Room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Date: Letters of interest are due by 5:00 p.m. February 25, 2019.

 Submittal: Letters of interest must be submitted electronically to PCAgrants@bayareametro.gov. Attachments to emails cannot be larger than 5 MB.

 Contact Information: Questions about the grant program or potential project ideas should be directed to PCAgrants@bayareametro.gov. 

Materials from Webinar on working on CAP projects with the Corps

The slides and recording from the October 10, 2018 webinar on the USACE Continuing Authorities Program can be found below:

Slides: CAP Overview_CA Coastal Conservancy Oct 2018_Final

Recording: