Job Posting: Environmental Justice and Tribal Liaison Specialist

Do you love the California Coast and the environment? Are you committed to environmental justice and tribal engagement? This might be the job for you! The State Coastal Conservancy is hiring a Permanent/Full-time Environmental Justice and Tribal Liaison Specialist.

 

This is a Statewide Recruitment for one position as a Conservancy Project Development Specialist (CPDS) or Conservancy Project Development Analyst II (CPDA II). This position may be filled in the Headquarters located in Oakland OR may be filled as a permanent remote position in the following counties: San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, Mendocino, Humboldt, or Del Norte.

 

The link to the job posting (JC-316045) with more information on the role and how to apply is here: https://www.calcareers.ca.gov/CalHrPublic/Jobs/JobPosting.aspx?JobControlId=316045

 

Final Filing Date: 9/29/2022

 

The State Coastal Conservancy has an exciting opportunity for you to join us in protecting California’s iconic lands and waters, restoring vital habitats, and increasing inclusive and equitable enjoyment of the coast and shoreline as our agency’s first Environmental Justice and Tribal Liaison Specialist. The Conservancy works with others on multi-benefit projects located along the coast of California, within coastal watersheds, and within the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area to acquire and protect natural and agricultural lands, restore and enhance habitats and ecosystems, design and build trails and other recreational facilities, plan and implement climate adaptation projects, implement urban greening projects, provide environmental education, and improve public access for historically underserved communities.

 

The Environmental Justice and Tribal Liaison Specialist will be responsible for ongoing development and implementation of the Conservancy’s Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) work, including coordination of tribal engagement and consultation. Duties will require leadership skills, a high level of independent action, and coordination with community groups, Tribes, Conservancy managers and staff, other public agencies, and nonprofits.

 

Coastal Conservancy Celebrates Groundbreaking of the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing at Liberty Canyon

Today, the State Coastal Conservancy joined Governor Newsom, the National Wildlife Federation, and partners to celebrate the start of construction on the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing at Liberty Canyon in Agoura Hills.

Spanning over ten lanes of the 101 freeway in the Agoura Hills area when complete, the crossing will be the largest in the world, the first of its kind in California, and a global model for urban wildlife conservation.  It will restore safe wildlife travel along a corridor between the inland Sierra Madre Mountains and the coastal Santa Monica Mountains.

Roads and development are deadly for animals trying to cross and have created islands of habitat that can genetically isolate wildlife, from bobcats to birds and lizards. This visionary wildlife crossing will preserve biodiversity across the region by re-connecting an integral wildlife corridor, and most critically, help save a threatened local population of mountain lions from extinction.

“Southern California is one of 25 hotspots of biological diversity on Earth but many coastal habitats in this region have been severed from inland landscapes.  Restoring connectivity across US-101 will provide southern California’s plant and animal life the essential habitat it needs for survival.” Said Amy Hutzel, Executive Officer of the Coastal Conservancy, “The Coastal Conservancy has been a staunch supporter of this project for many years, having funded the environmental assessment and design of the crossing in 2015, so we are thrilled to break ground on this project that will have a huge positive impact on regional biodiversity and means so much to the people of the LA area.”

 

Mary and Emely at Liberty Canyon Groundbreaking

Coastal Conservancy Deputy Executive Officer Mary Small and Project Manager Emely Lopez at the groundbreaking of the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing at Liberty Canyon

Proposition 84 Notice and Posting Information

Project Name and Action

Banning Ranch Acquisition

Possible authorization to disburse up to $5,000,000 for the acquisition of 384 acres at Banning Ranch in Orange County.

 

Conservancy Board meeting: May 5, 2022

 

Satisfaction of PRC Section 75071 criteria:

The proposed acquisition satisfies two of the specified criteria in Section 75071.  Pursuant to subsection (c) the project will protect a large area of coastal bluff, coastal sage scrub, and coastal wetlands habitat, which are all under-protected habitat types.  Per subsection (e), the project has more than fifty percent non-state matching contributions.

Community Engagement for the Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project

The California State Coastal Conservancy requests the services of an expert in participatory community engagement to develop and implement robust community engagement for the Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project (Project), located in the Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve in the City of Los Angeles. The Contractor will develop and implement community  participation that is representative of the diversity and demographics of the Los Angeles County regarding the Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project. The Conservancy and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (the landowner and project lead) aim to understand the concerns, experience, and priorities of the Los Angeles residents to implement the Ballona Wetland Restoration Project in a way that is inclusive and accessible to respective visitors.

The Conservancy is seeking a Contractor with strong experience in underserved community engagement and justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion work to develop and implement a community engagement process for the Project. Please see the complete request for services for the proposed scope of services.

To apply, you will need to include qualifications, project approach, project team, resume, examples of relevant projects, and three references. More information on how to apply is available in the Request for Services.

REQUEST FOR SERVICES

Submittals must be received by 5:00 pm on April 15, 2022.

An electronic copy (in PDF format; less than 20 Mb in size) of the submittal should be emailed to Megan Cooper, South Coast Regional Manager, State Coastal Conservancy, Megan.cooper@ scc.ca.gov.

 

An acknowledgment that the Conservancy has received the submittal will be sent by email. If your submittal is not acknowledged by then, please call Megan Cooper at 510-286-4162.

 

Press Release: Coastal Conservancy Authorized $14.6m for Coastal Access, Restoration, and Climate Resilience

3/24/2022 – Today, the Board of the State Coastal Conservancy approved $14.6 million in grants for restoration, protection, public access, and climate resilience along the California coast and San Francisco Bay.

Included in the approvals were $3,420,000 to Save the Redwoods League to acquire conservation easements on 3,862-acres of the Weger Ranch property within the Big River watershed in Mendocino County, and over $7 million to several organizations, including $5,281,709 to the Yurok Tribe, to construct initial public access improvements and visitor amenities for the Redwood National and State Park Visitor Center and Restoration Project.

The full list of projects approved can be found below:

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

  1. A grant of up to $320,000 to the Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation to enhance habitat, protect and increase endangered plant species populations, and engage the local community in the restoration and conservation of five vernal pool properties on the Santa Rosa Plain, Sonoma County.
  2. A grant of up to $836,400 to Acterra for Climate Resilient Communities to implement the pilot phase of the East Palo Alto Rain Garden Project in the city of East Palo Alto, San Mateo County.
  3. A grant of up to $281,087 to California Trout, Inc. to augment the Conservancy’s grant of $196,123, authorized on June 18, 2020 for studies and designs, to prepare revised designs of the Sulphur Creek Fish Passage Improvement Project, Napa County to include bridge replacement.

NORTH COAST

  1. A grant of up to $3,420,000 to Save the Redwoods League to acquire conservation easements on 3,862-acres of the Weger Ranch property within the Big River watershed in Mendocino County, for the purposes of natural resource and water quality protection, sustainable forest management and open space preservation.
  2. Authorization to disburse funds received by the Conservancy from the Ocean Protection Council, the Wildlife Conservation Board California Riparian Habitat Conservation Program, and Save the Redwoods League to restore approximately 11.5 acres of riparian habitat on lower Prairie Creek as part of the Redwood National and State Park Visitor Center and Restoration Projectat the former Orick Mill A site in Humboldt County, as follows: up to $5,281,709 to the Yurok Tribe and up to $1,320,427 to Caltrout, Inc.; and authorization to disburse up to $794,000 in funds received by the Conservancy from the Wildlife Conservation Board Public Access Program to Save the Redwoods League to construct initial public access improvements and visitor amenities for the Redwood National and State Park Visitor Center and Restoration Project.

CENTRAL COAST

  1. A grant of up to $500,000 to Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District to acquire 644-acres of the Johnston Ranch property for natural resource protection and restoration, open space, compatible agricultural preservation, and public access, located adjacent to the City of Half Moon Bay in San Mateo County.
  2. A grant of up to $530,000 to the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County to construct an all-access trail and improvements to associated visitor-serving amenities at Antonelli Pond in Santa Cruz County, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.
  3. A grant of up to $2,934,892 to San Mateo County to construct public access improvements and visitor-serving amenities at Tunitas Creek Beach in San Mateo County, of which $2,174,892 will derive from remaining unexpended funds from a Conservancy grant authorized on March 14, 2019 for the acquisition and planning of the project, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.

SOUTH COAST

  1. Authorization to (1) disburse up to $500,000 to hire contractors to develop and implement participation from tribal communities, community groups, and residents of the greater Los Angeles region to assist in planning the Ballona Wetlands Restoration project; and (2) disburse up to $53,000 to the Friends of Ballona Wetlands to restore disturbed riparian habitat at the Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve in Los Angeles County.

 

Request For Services: Tribal Connection to Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project

*** UPDATES AND CORRECTIONS***

  1. On page 19 of the Request for Services, #1. D., we stated that Errors and Omissions (E&O) Insurance would be required for the Contract.  We have decided that E&O Insurance will not be required for this contract.
  2. On page 20 of the Request for Services, #2.D., we stated that $2 million of E&O Insurance would be required for this contract.  Per the change above, E&O Insurance will not be required for this contract.
  3. There was a typo on page 10 of the RFS under Contract Budget.  Instead of saying “See Section B.2 below” it should have read, “see the Budget section beginning on Page 12″.

 

The State Coastal Conservancy requests the services of an expert in community engagement with tribal governments, tribal groups, and tribal community members in Southern California. The Contractor will develop and implement participation from tribal communities regarding the Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project. The Conservancy and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (the landowner and project lead) aim to understand the concerns, experience, and priorities of the tribes to implement the Ballona Wetland Restoration Project in a way that is respectful of and beneficial to local tribes that have occupied the project area from time immemorial.

Potential Contractors should have significant, established experience in tribal engagement in Southern California. Please see the complete request for services for the proposed scope of services.

To apply, you will need to include qualifications, project approach, project team, resume, examples of relevant projects, and three references. More information on how to apply is available in the Request for Services.

Request for Services (PDF)

Request for Services (Word Doc Download)

The Conservancy will attempt to negotiate a contract with the highest-ranked Contractor at compensation that the Conservancy determines is fair and reasonable to California.

Submittals must be received by 12:00 pm on February 25, 2022.

An electronic copy (in PDF format; less than 20 Mb in size) of the submittal should be emailed to Megan Cooper, South Coast Regional Manager, State Coastal Conservancy, Megan.cooper@ scc.ca.gov

An acknowledgment that the Conservancy has received the submittal will be sent by email by 5:00 pm on the same day. If your submittal is not acknowledged by then, please call Megan Cooper at 510-286-4162.

Press Release: Coastal Conservancy Board Approves $12.6 million for Coastal Restoration, Protection and Public Access 

12/2/2021 – Today, the Board of the State Coastal Conservancy approved over $12.6 million in grants for coastal restoration, protection and public access.

Included in the approvals were over $10 million to the City of Fullerton to acquire a 13.7-acre property in the West Coyote Hills area of north Orange County for open space, habitat protection, watershed management, and public access, $120,000 to Mycelium Youth Network for up to four priority climate adaptation projects to be implemented at Metwest High School in Oakland, and $52,000 of voluntary tax check-off funding to Sea Otter Savvy to implement a project to aid in recovery of the southern sea otter.

The full list of project approved can be found below:

NORTH COAST

  1. A grant of up to $242,000 to the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy to complete the final phase of the Hawk Hill Access Improvements Project within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area at Hawk Hill, Marin County.
  2. A grant of up to $1,000,000 to the Marin Resource Conservation District to plan and implement carbon farming projects that improve soil productivity, water sustainability and greenhouse gas sequestration for agriculture and watershed resiliency on ranches in western Marin County, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.
  3. A grant of up to $300,000 to the Yurok Tribe to enhance salmonid habitat in Hunter and McGarvey Creeks, tributaries to the lower Klamath River in Del Norte County, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.

SF BAY

  1. A grant of up to $120,000 to Mycelium Youth Network to identify and plan up to four priority climate adaptation projects to be implemented at Metwest High School.

CENTRAL COAST

  1. A grant of up to $52,000 to Sea Otter Savvy to implement a project to aid in recovery of the southern sea otter, consisting of conducting an educational outreach and community engagement program on responsible viewing of wild sea otters to reduce sea otter disturbance in Santa Cruz, Monterey, and San Luis Obispo counties.
  2. A grant of up to $60,000 to augment an existing Conservancy authorization of $400,230 for consultant services to facilitate development of a contemporary Hollister Ranch Coastal Access Program, in Santa Barbara County.
  3. A grant of up to $300,000 to the County of San Luis Obispo to renovate the Veteran’s Hall and construct adjacent access facilities in the town of Cayucos.

 SOUTH COAST

  1. A grant of up to $66,000 to Nature Collective to remove invasive plant species on 14.5 acres of coastal wetlands at the Batiquitos Lagoon Ecological Reserve in San Diego County.
  2. A grant of up to $379,350 to the County of Ventura to conduct planning and to develop design criteria, preliminary design plans and alternatives refinement for improvements to the Robles Diversion and Fish Passage Facility in unincorporated Ventura County.
  3. A grant of up to $10,134,450 to the City of Fullerton to acquire a 13.7-acre property in the West Coyote Hills area of north Orange County for open space, habitat protection, watershed management, and public access.

Amy Hutzel Appointed New Executive Officer of the State Coastal Conservancy

The State Coastal Conservancy is pleased to announce the appointment of its new Executive Officer, Amy Hutzel.

Amy Hutzel

Amy Hutzel

Ms. Hutzel previously served as the Conservancy’s Deputy Executive Officer and has been with the agency for over twenty years, during which she has been instrumental in many key projects including the restoration of thousands of acres of former salt ponds in the San Francisco Bay, the creation of the Conservancy’s flagship Explore the Coast and Explore the Coast Overnight grant programs to expand coastal access, and establishing the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority. She also led the development and implementation of many of the Conservancy’s equity-focused initiatives: Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Guidelines, the ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan, the Beach Wheelchair Grant Program, and the updated Coastal Access Project Standards.

“The State Coastal Conservancy has had a remarkable impact on the California coast in the last 4 decades.” said Ms. Hutzel, “I am honored to take on this role at a time when our work is so essential. Together with the incredible Conservancy staff, I will work to accelerate projects that work with nature to adapt to climate change impacts and increase equitable access to the coast for all Californians.”

“The Coastal Conservancy plays a vital role in achieving the State’s goals for biodiversity, climate resilience, and equitable access to California’s natural wonders. Amy has proven herself as an exceptional leader at the Coastal Conservancy already and I could not be more excited for her to take the reins at this key agency.” said California’s Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot

Each year, the State Coastal Conservancy issues tens of millions of dollars in grants to non-profit organizations, public agencies, and tribes for projects that restore and protect the California coast, increase public access to it, and increase communities’ resilience to climate change. In addition to its annual appropriations from Natural Resource Bonds, on September 23, 2021, Governor Newsom signed a budget bill that includes a total of $500 million for coastal resilience to be appropriated to the Conservancy in Fiscal Years 2022-23 and 2023-24. The Executive Officer and staff of the Conservancy also manage the work of the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority, which allocates approximately $25 million each year for restoration projects on the San Francisco Bay shoreline.

“We’re thrilled for Amy to serve as the Executive Officer at the Conservancy,” said Doug Bosco, Chair of the State Coastal Conservancy’s Board, “The Board and I know Amy as a dedicated and collaborative leader with an exceptional track record of delivering complex projects. She will bring her energy and enthusiasm to this role, and a clear vision for what this agency can achieve.”

Ms. Hutzel has been with the State Coastal Conservancy for over 20 years, serving as Deputy Executive Officer, Bay Area Program Manager, and Project Manager. Prior to joining the Conservancy, she worked at Save The Bay and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

As Executive Officer, she will work closely with the Boards of the Conservancy and the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority, lead the Conservancy’s 70 members of staff, and support hundreds of climate adaptation, public access, and habitat protection and restoration projects throughout the California coast, in the San Francisco Bay Area, and in coastal watersheds. Amy lives with her husband and two children in San Francisco.

 

Coastal Stories Grant Program Launched to Support Inclusive Storytelling about the California Coast

The Coastal Conservancy has launched a new grant program that intends to make the outdoors more inclusive and welcoming for all Californians by fostering representation of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and other historically excluded groups in outdoor spaces – through storytelling.

Our Coastal Stories Grant Program seeks to fund projects that plan, develop, and implement storytelling installations or materials (such as murals, signage, monuments, or guides) that represent communities and voices that have been historically excluded in the storytelling of California’s coast and publicly accessible lands. These communities may include but are not limited to BIPOC people, people with disabilities, immigrant communities, low-income communities, and other historically excluded communities.

All projects must present a story connected to publicly-accessible outdoors spaces within our jurisdiction,  in a way that will reach the public. We encourage proposals for projects that are community-led, that show strong community and landowner partnerships, and that use creative forms of historical, ecological, and cultural storytelling.

Learn more here.

 

Press Release: Coastal Conservancy Awards $14 million for Coastal Access, Protection, and Restoration

Yesterday, the Board of the State Coastal Conservancy authorized over $14 million in funding for restoration, preservation, and public access to California’s coast and coastal watersheds.

The projects approved included $495,000 to design and permit access amenities and a new ADA-compliant bathroom at Lechuza Beach in Malibu, $755,820 to remove fish barriers and restore habitat on Davy Brown Creek in the Santa Maria River watershed, and $1,721,088 to nonprofit organizations and public agencies for 45 projects that create coastal experiences for communities facing barriers to coastal access. These 45 grants are part of the Conservancy’s Explore the Coast grant program, which aims to help more Californians, particularly those that have been historically excluded, access and enjoy the coast.

The grants awarded this week will not only enhance the health and accessibility of the California coast, but will help to make it more resilient to the challenges of rising seas and a changing climate.

 

NORTH COAST

  1. Authorization to transfer fee title to nine Conservancy-owned parcels in the Bodega Bay area to the County of Sonoma; approval of the implementation/disposition plans for the property transfer; and authorization to disburse up to $34,000 to Sonoma County Regional Parks to prepare surveys and Phase 1 environmental site assessments of the parcels.

CENTRAL COAST

  1. A grant of up to $165,000 to Trout Unlimited to augment an existing Conservancy grant authorized on May 24, 2018, to replace a concrete creek crossing with a fish-friendly box culvert on Cachagua Creek, a tributary to the Carmel River in Monterey County.
  2. A grant of up to $216,636 to the Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) to conduct invasive plant removal to enhance native riparian habitat on the Santa Clara Riverin Ventura County.
  3. A grant of up to $980,000 awarded to the Conservancy by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under its National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program to the Elkhorn Slough Foundation to augment a Conservancy grant authorized on December 19, 2019 to complete Phase 2 of the Elkhorn Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Projectin Elkhorn Slough, Monterey County.
  4. A grant of up to $212,812 to San Mateo County Harbor District to construct new public restrooms, realign a small segment of the California Coastal Trail, reconfigure the parking lot, and install other visitor-serving amenities at Pillar Point Harboradjacent to Surfer’s Beach in San Mateo County.
  5. A grant of up to $100,000 to the County of Santa Cruz to develop a facilities and management plan for public access and natural resource protection for the north coast region of Santa Cruz County.
  6. A grant of up to $755,820 to Earth Island Institute to remove two fish barriers, replace them with bridges, and restore habitat on Davy Brown Creek, located in the Santa Maria River watershed, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.
  7. A grant of up to $825,000 to the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County for the acquisition of three conservation easements on the 7,681-acre Attiyeh Ranchin northern San Luis Obispo County.

 

SOUTH COAST

  1. A grant of up to $200,000 to San Diego Botanic Garden (SDBG) to enhance and restore 4.6 acres of riparian upland habitatat Ocean Knoll Canyon in the City of Encinitas, San Diego County.
  2. A grant of up to $35,780 to Orange County Coastkeeper to conduct monitoring and outreach to protect endangered bird species and associated habitat located near the Santa Ana River Mouthin the cities of Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.
  3. A grant of up to $180,680 to the Environmental Center of San Diego to prepare environmental assessments, permit applications, and draft engineering designs to provide additional public access at Princess Streetin La Jolla, San Diego.
  4. A grant of up to $3,500,000 to augment the Conservancy grant of $4,900,000, previously authorized to the Crystal Cove Conservancy to restore 17 historic cottages on North Beach of the Crystal Cove Historic District at Crystal Cove State Park in Orange County.
  5. A grant of up to $200,000 to the Sierra Health Foundation to work with tribal entities to conduct planning to further tribal access, tribal participation in land management, and land acquisition by tribal entities at multiple sites in Orange County.
  6. A grant of up to $330,040 to Amigos de los Rios to implement the Monrovia High School Watershed Discovery Projectin Monrovia, Los Angeles County.
  7. Authorization to terminate the Coastal Conservancy’s Calleguas Creek Watershed In-lieu Fee Programby disbursing $2,453,773 million for the purchase of 58.11 jurisdictional wetland and riparian buffer credits from the Santa Paula Creek Mitigation Bank.
  8. A grant of up to $495,000 to the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority to prepare final engineering designs and construction specifications, and prepare and submit permit applications needed to: 1) update and repair existing public beach access amenities, including two beach stairways, and to 2) install new Americans with Disabilities Act compliant public access amenities, including a restroom, at Lechuza Beachin the City of Malibu.
  9. A grant of up to $1,342,500 to the Riverside County Regional Park and Open Space District for construction of a segment of the Santa Ana River Trailas part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Prado Dam Alcoa Dike construction project, and adoption of findings under the California Environmental Quality Act.
  10. A grant of up to $310,000 to Coastal Quest to conduct stakeholder outreach and engagement for coastal resiliency planning for state parkson the San Diego County coast.

STATEWIDE

  1. $1,721,088 to nonprofit organizations and public agencies for 45 projects that facilitate and enhance the public’s opportunities to explore the California coast. Participants are drawn from throughout the State and will visit coastal locations from Del Norte County south to San Diego County.

 

Latest News

  • Coastal Conservancy Public Meeting in Pacific Grove – December 01
      Meeting Notice Douglas Bosco (Public Member), Chair Ann Notthoff (Public Member), Vice Chair Marce Gutiérrez-Graudi?š (Public Member) Joseph Alioto Jr. (Public Member) Wade Crowfoot, Secretary for Natural Resources; Bryan Cash (Designated) Donne Brownsey, Coastal Commission Chair; Madeline Cavalieri (Designated) Keely Bosler, Director, Department of Finance; Gayle Miller (Designated) Senate Representatives Benjamin Allen (District 26) […] (Read more on Coastal Conservancy Public...)
  • SCC Grant Availability Webinar Nov 9
    The State of California has made an unprecedented investment in the resilience and accessibility of the coast.  As a result, the Coastal Conservancy has significant funding available to non-profit organizations, public agencies, and federally-recognized tribes for projects that benefit public access, natural resources, working lands, and climate resiliency at the coast, coastal watersheds, and the San […] (Read more on SCC Grant Availability...)
  • Call for Applications to Serve on the Explore the Coast Advisory Board
      California’s ocean, coast, and beaches have long been recognized and used as spaces of joy, relaxation, and healing. The State Coastal Conservancy’s Explore the Coast (ETC) grant program seeks to provide coastal experiences for people and communities who face challenges or barriers to accessing or enjoying the coast (“ETC Priority Communities”). ETC Priority Communities […] (Read more on Call for Applications...)
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